kajimaKAJIMA CORPORATION

 
News & Notes
Vol. 14
Autumn 2000
Japan's Largest Mosque Completed in Tokyo
image Kajima recently completed the construction of the Tokyo Mosque and Cultural Center (also known as the Tokyo Mosque) in Tokyo's Shibuya district. Modeled after the 16th century Turkish mosques designed by architect Mimar Sinan, the Tokyo Mosque was built using modern construction techniques. The basic design was created by Hilmi Senalp, who is considered Turkey's top authority with regard to mosque construction. Kajima Design acted as local architect while Kajima was responsible for constructing the mosque structure and installing necessary equipment and effectively acted as con-struction manager. The Turkish government's reli-gion agency handled the placement of interior and exterior facings and furnishings.

The Turkish government provided comprehensive support for the construction work and covered most of the 1.2 billion yen construction cost, although the overall project cost is estimated to have been considerably more than 3.0 billion yen. The new mosque is on the site of another mosque that was built in 1938, but which had fallen into disrepair and been demolished in 1986. Construction work on the new mosque began in March 1998.


Occupying a 734.2m2 site, the Tokyo Mosque is an RC structure with one basement floor and three above-ground floors with a total floor area of 1,476.75m2 . The mosque's distinctive dome is 23.25m tall, while the adjacent minaret is 41.48m tall. It is the first mosque of its size to be built in Japan.

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The main dome is supported by six pillars, two of which are concrete-filled steel tubes that represent a synthesis of Osman Turkish mosque design and modern technology. The dome was constructed using the truss wall method, which involved the installation of a truss framework of metal laths and the placement of concrete atop that framework. The 16-sided minaret was constructed through the placement of a cylindrical internal mold and external molds in 3m stages.

To ensure conformance with Japanese building codes, Kajima handled the main construction work while Turkish craftsmen were responsible for the interior and exterior facings and furnishings that have religious significance. Approximately 70 Turkish craftsmen were dispatched to perform the finishing details, which entailed the use of a considerable quantity of marble imported from Turkey.

 

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Vol. 14
Autumn 2000


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